Tier 1 National Org

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Today, December 12

  • Your profile picture
    5:52pm

    Local 443 (Olympia/Thurston/Mason)

    WEBSITE: WFSELocal443.org
    EMAIL: [email protected]
    FACEBOOK:  Facebook.com/wfse-local-443
    MEETINGS:  3RD TUE of the month at 6pm at Local 443 Office, 906 Columbia Street SW #205, Olympia 98501.
    ELECTIONS:  JAN, in odd years.

  • Your profile picture
    4:31pm
    Changes to Attachments
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    File: afscme_constitution_2016_spanish
      
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    4:18pm
    Changes to Body
     
    *Settlement Summary between Local 1321, DC 37, AFSCME and Queens Public Library*
     
    *Settlement Summary between Local 1321, DC 37, AFSCME and Queens Public Library*
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    Local 1321’s Bargaining Committee and the Library’s Administration reached an historic deal on a new collective bargaining agreement, replacing our contract that was last negotiated in 1999. Read more
    +
    Local 1321’s Bargaining Committee and the Library’s Administration reached an historic deal on a new collective bargaining agreement, replacing our contract that was last negotiated in 1999. Read more. [1]
      +
    [1] https://afscmeatwork.org/queens-library-guild-local-1321/settlement-summary-between-local-1321-dc-37-afscme-and-queens-public
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    4:17pm
    Changes to Body
      +
    *Settlement Summary between Local 1321, DC 37, AFSCME and Queens Public Library*
      +
    Local 1321’s Bargaining Committee and the Library’s Administration reached an historic deal on a new collective bargaining agreement, replacing our contract that was last negotiated in 1999. Read more
    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:11pm

    Local 1321’s Bargaining Committee and the Library’s Administration reached an historic deal on a new collective bargaining agreement, replacing our contract that was last negotiated in 1999.

    For over seventeen years, Local 1321 members worked with an outdated contract that neglected many pressing issues. To rectify this, the local’s bargaining committee spent many hours formulating demands; meeting with library staff and each other; and negotiating with the administration. In the end, both parties achieved a contract that benefits the library, making it a better place to work and a happier workforce.

  • Your profile picture
    12:08pm
    Changes to Primary Image
    -
    Image: logoc28color-notag-200.png
    +
    Image: afscme.png
    Changes to Logo
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    Image: logoc28color-notag-200-tr3.png
    +
    Image: afscme-200.png
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  • Your profile picture
    11:57am

    Labor Advocate Reports

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    11:56am

    Labor Advocate Reports

  • Your profile picture
    11:55am

    Labor Advocate Reports

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    11:54am

    Labor Advocate Reports

  • Your profile picture
    11:40am

    Rehabilitation Services

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    11:36am

    Economic Services Adminstration

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    11:35am

    Developmental Disabilities Administration

  • Your profile picture
    11:33am

    Hardworking Americans’ right to retire with dignity is in danger because billionaires are spending a lot of money to take away our pensions.

    John Arnold is one of the worst offenders. He’s a former Enron trader who’s spent $50 million of his own fortune trying to gut retirement security nationally. Enron’s implosion caused billions of dollars of losses to its workers and their families, including a $1.5 billion hit to public pension assets. Yet Arnold escaped with an $8 million bonus right before the crash.

    Now he’s turned his attention to public pensions. Arnold funds ballot initiatives, tainted research, lobbying and political campaigns to eliminate traditional pensions that retirees can count on.

    Through his Laura and John Arnold Foundation and its policy advocacy arm, Action Now Initiative, he has spent money:

    • Convincing cities and states to cut employee pension benefits.
    • Donating to right-wing think tanks to do “research” that advocates for eliminating public pensions.
    • Giving almost $10 million to Pew to do the same, according to the National Public Pension Coalition.
    • Spending $3.5 million on a PBS series on hundreds of stations that promoted cuts to public employee pensions (which the PBS affiliate had to return due to the conflict of interest).

    Arnold keeps trying to manufacture a pension crisis and to give fake ammo to some GOP lawmakers determined to cut pensions.

    Except in Minnesota, that crisis isn’t real:

    • While public pensions were hit by the Recession like everything else was, they are recovering nicely. Pension reforms and strong investment returns have stabilized our pension funds. The three systems (MSRS, PERA and TRA) have $63 billion in assets, so there’s no need to panic.
    • Pensions are mostly funded by the workers themselves and by investment returns. Minnesota taxpayers pay for only 15 cents on every dollar in public pension benefits; the remaining 85 cents comes from employee contributions and investment returns.
    • That tax money comes back to the public: Every dollar that goes into a pension fund generates $9.98 that’s spent in our communities.

    While some GOP lawmakers keep trying to gut public workers’ retirements, they’re ignoring an obvious funding source, one that doesn’t rely on decades of employees’ hard work. States and cities spend $80 billion a year on corporate subsidies. That’s more than enough to make up any shortfall in pension funding and then some, according to David Sirota’s report “The Plot Against Pensions.”

    Pushing people out of traditional pensions into a...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    11:33am

    Hardworking Americans’ right to retire with dignity is in danger because billionaires are spending a lot of money to take away our pensions.

    John Arnold is one of the worst offenders. He’s a former Enron trader who’s spent $50 million of his own fortune trying to gut retirement security nationally. Enron’s implosion caused billions of dollars of losses to its workers and their families, including a $1.5 billion hit to public pension assets. Yet Arnold escaped with an $8 million bonus right before the crash.

    Now he’s turned his attention to public pensions. Arnold funds ballot initiatives, tainted research, lobbying and political campaigns to eliminate traditional pensions that retirees can count on.

    Through his Laura and John Arnold Foundation and its policy advocacy arm, Action Now Initiative, he has spent money:

    • Convincing cities and states to cut employee pension benefits.
    • Donating to right-wing think tanks to do “research” that advocates for eliminating public pensions.
    • Giving almost $10 million to Pew to do the same, according to the National Public Pension Coalition.
    • Spending $3.5 million on a PBS series on hundreds of stations that promoted cuts to public employee pensions (which the PBS affiliate had to return due to the conflict of interest).

    Arnold keeps trying to manufacture a pension crisis and to give fake ammo to some GOP lawmakers determined to cut pensions.

    Except in Minnesota, that crisis isn’t real:

    • While public pensions were hit by the Recession like everything else was, they are recovering nicely. Pension reforms and strong investment returns have stabilized our pension funds. The three systems (MSRS, PERA and TRA) have $63 billion in assets, so there’s no need to panic.
    • Pensions are mostly funded by the workers themselves and by investment returns. Minnesota taxpayers pay for only 15 cents on every dollar in public pension benefits; the remaining 85 cents comes from employee contributions and investment returns.
    • That tax money comes back to the public: Every dollar that goes into a pension fund generates $9.98 that’s spent in our communities.

    While some GOP lawmakers keep trying to gut public workers’ retirements, they’re ignoring an obvious funding source, one that doesn’t rely on decades of employees’ hard work. States and cities spend $80 billion a year on corporate subsidies. That’s more than enough to make up any shortfall in pension funding and then some, according to David Sirota’s report “The Plot Against Pensions.”

    Pushing people out of traditional pensions into a...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    11:33am

    Hardworking Americans’ right to retire with dignity is in danger because billionaires are spending a lot of money to take away our pensions.

    John Arnold is one of the worst offenders. He’s a former Enron trader who’s spent $50 million of his own fortune trying to gut retirement security nationally. Enron’s implosion caused billions of dollars of losses to its workers and their families, including a $1.5 billion hit to public pension assets. Yet Arnold escaped with an $8 million bonus right before the crash.

    Now he’s turned his attention to public pensions. Arnold funds ballot initiatives, tainted research, lobbying and political campaigns to eliminate traditional pensions that retirees can count on.

    Through his Laura and John Arnold Foundation and its policy advocacy arm, Action Now Initiative, he has spent money:

    • Convincing cities and states to cut employee pension benefits.
    • Donating to right-wing think tanks to do “research” that advocates for eliminating public pensions.
    • Giving almost $10 million to Pew to do the same, according to the National Public Pension Coalition.
    • Spending $3.5 million on a PBS series on hundreds of stations that promoted cuts to public employee pensions (which the PBS affiliate had to return due to the conflict of interest).

    Arnold keeps trying to manufacture a pension crisis and to give fake ammo to some GOP lawmakers determined to cut pensions.

    Except in Minnesota, that crisis isn’t real:

    • While public pensions were hit by the Recession like everything else was, they are recovering nicely. Pension reforms and strong investment returns have stabilized our pension funds. The three systems (MSRS, PERA and TRA) have $63 billion in assets, so there’s no need to panic.
    • Pensions are mostly funded by the workers themselves and by investment returns. Minnesota taxpayers pay for only 15 cents on every dollar in public pension benefits; the remaining 85 cents comes from employee contributions and investment returns.
    • That tax money comes back to the public: Every dollar that goes into a pension fund generates $9.98 that’s spent in our communities.

    While some GOP lawmakers keep trying to gut public workers’ retirements, they’re ignoring an obvious funding source, one that doesn’t rely on decades of employees’ hard work. States and cities spend $80 billion a year on corporate subsidies. That’s more than enough to make up any shortfall in pension funding and then some, according to David Sirota’s report “The Plot Against Pensions.”

    Pushing people out of traditional pensions into a...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    11:33am

    Hardworking Americans’ right to retire with dignity is in danger because billionaires are spending a lot of money to take away our pensions.

    John Arnold is one of the worst offenders. He’s a former Enron trader who’s spent $50 million of his own fortune trying to gut retirement security nationally. Enron’s implosion caused billions of dollars of losses to its workers and their families, including a $1.5 billion hit to public pension assets. Yet Arnold escaped with an $8 million bonus right before the crash.

    Now he’s turned his attention to public pensions. Arnold funds ballot initiatives, tainted research, lobbying and political campaigns to eliminate traditional pensions that retirees can count on.

    Through his Laura and John Arnold Foundation and its policy advocacy arm, Action Now Initiative, he has spent money:

    • Convincing cities and states to cut employee pension benefits.
    • Donating to right-wing think tanks to do “research” that advocates for eliminating public pensions.
    • Giving almost $10 million to Pew to do the same, according to the National Public Pension Coalition.
    • Spending $3.5 million on a PBS series on hundreds of stations that promoted cuts to public employee pensions (which the PBS affiliate had to return due to the conflict of interest).

    Arnold keeps trying to manufacture a pension crisis and to give fake ammo to some GOP lawmakers determined to cut pensions.

    Except in Minnesota, that crisis isn’t real:

    • While public pensions were hit by the Recession like everything else was, they are recovering nicely. Pension reforms and strong investment returns have stabilized our pension funds. The three systems (MSRS, PERA and TRA) have $63 billion in assets, so there’s no need to panic.
    • Pensions are mostly funded by the workers themselves and by investment returns. Minnesota taxpayers pay for only 15 cents on every dollar in public pension benefits; the remaining 85 cents comes from employee contributions and investment returns.
    • That tax money comes back to the public: Every dollar that goes into a pension fund generates $9.98 that’s spent in our communities.

    While some GOP lawmakers keep trying to gut public workers’ retirements, they’re ignoring an obvious funding source, one that doesn’t rely on decades of employees’ hard work. States and cities spend $80 billion a year on corporate subsidies. That’s more than enough to make up any shortfall in pension funding and then some, according to David Sirota’s report “The Plot Against Pensions.”

    Pushing people out of traditional pensions into a...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    11:33am

    Hardworking Americans’ right to retire with dignity is in danger because billionaires are spending a lot of money to take away our pensions.

    John Arnold is one of the worst offenders. He’s a former Enron trader who’s spent $50 million of his own fortune trying to gut retirement security nationally. Enron’s implosion caused billions of dollars of losses to its workers and their families, including a $1.5 billion hit to public pension assets. Yet Arnold escaped with an $8 million bonus right before the crash.

    Now he’s turned his attention to public pensions. Arnold funds ballot initiatives, tainted research, lobbying and political campaigns to eliminate traditional pensions that retirees can count on.

    Through his Laura and John Arnold Foundation and its policy advocacy arm, Action Now Initiative, he has spent money:

    • Convincing cities and states to cut employee pension benefits.
    • Donating to right-wing think tanks to do “research” that advocates for eliminating public pensions.
    • Giving almost $10 million to Pew to do the same, according to the National Public Pension Coalition.
    • Spending $3.5 million on a PBS series on hundreds of stations that promoted cuts to public employee pensions (which the PBS affiliate had to return due to the conflict of interest).

    Arnold keeps trying to manufacture a pension crisis and to give fake ammo to some GOP lawmakers determined to cut pensions.

    Except in Minnesota, that crisis isn’t real:

    • While public pensions were hit by the Recession like everything else was, they are recovering nicely. Pension reforms and strong investment returns have stabilized our pension funds. The three systems (MSRS, PERA and TRA) have $63 billion in assets, so there’s no need to panic.
    • Pensions are mostly funded by the workers themselves and by investment returns. Minnesota taxpayers pay for only 15 cents on every dollar in public pension benefits; the remaining 85 cents comes from employee contributions and investment returns.
    • That tax money comes back to the public: Every dollar that goes into a pension fund generates $9.98 that’s spent in our communities.

    While some GOP lawmakers keep trying to gut public workers’ retirements, they’re ignoring an obvious funding source, one that doesn’t rely on decades of employees’ hard work. States and cities spend $80 billion a year on corporate subsidies. That’s more than enough to make up any shortfall in pension funding and then some, according to David Sirota’s report “The Plot Against Pensions.”

    Pushing people out of traditional pensions into a...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    11:33am

    Hardworking Americans’ right to retire with dignity is in danger because billionaires are spending a lot of money to take away our pensions.

    John Arnold is one of the worst offenders. He’s a former Enron trader who’s spent $50 million of his own fortune trying to gut retirement security nationally. Enron’s implosion caused billions of dollars of losses to its workers and their families, including a $1.5 billion hit to public pension assets. Yet Arnold escaped with an $8 million bonus right before the crash.

    Now he’s turned his attention to public pensions. Arnold funds ballot initiatives, tainted research, lobbying and political campaigns to eliminate traditional pensions that retirees can count on.

    Through his Laura and John Arnold Foundation and its policy advocacy arm, Action Now Initiative, he has spent money:

    • Convincing cities and states to cut employee pension benefits.
    • Donating to right-wing think tanks to do “research” that advocates for eliminating public pensions.
    • Giving almost $10 million to Pew to do the same, according to the National Public Pension Coalition.
    • Spending $3.5 million on a PBS series on hundreds of stations that promoted cuts to public employee pensions (which the PBS affiliate had to return due to the conflict of interest).

    Arnold keeps trying to manufacture a pension crisis and to give fake ammo to some GOP lawmakers determined to cut pensions.

    Except in Minnesota, that crisis isn’t real:

    • While public pensions were hit by the Recession like everything else was, they are recovering nicely. Pension reforms and strong investment returns have stabilized our pension funds. The three systems (MSRS, PERA and TRA) have $63 billion in assets, so there’s no need to panic.
    • Pensions are mostly funded by the workers themselves and by investment returns. Minnesota taxpayers pay for only 15 cents on every dollar in public pension benefits; the remaining 85 cents comes from employee contributions and investment returns.
    • That tax money comes back to the public: Every dollar that goes into a pension fund generates $9.98 that’s spent in our communities.

    While some GOP lawmakers keep trying to gut public workers’ retirements, they’re ignoring an obvious funding source, one that doesn’t rely on decades of employees’ hard work. States and cities spend $80 billion a year on corporate subsidies. That’s more than enough to make up any shortfall in pension funding and then some, according to David Sirota’s report “The Plot Against Pensions.”

    Pushing people out of traditional pensions into a...

    Read more
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