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Yesterday, October 23

  • Your profile picture
    3:39pm
    Changes to Body
     
    *Oct. 22, 2021 - Daily News - *Eric Adams welcomes court decision to delay NYC municipal retiree health benefit plan updates*
     
    *Oct. 22, 2021 - Daily News - *Eric Adams welcomes court decision to delay NYC municipal retiree health benefit plan updates*
     
    * [1]
     
    * [1]
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    *Oct. 22, 2021 - The City - *Court Blocks Controversial Medicare Switch for Retired NYC Workers [2]    [*Oct. 21, 2021 -* Click here to read the judge's temporary restraining order [3].] [Click here to read the Municipal Labor Committee statement.]
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    *Oct. 22, 2021 - The City - *Court Blocks Controversial Medicare Switch for Retired NYC Workers [2]  [*Oct. 21, 2021 -* Click here to read the judge's temporary restraining order [3].]
     
    *Oct. 21, 2021 - Newsday (Opinion) - *The municipal retiree healthcare storm*
     
    *Oct. 21, 2021 - Newsday (Opinion) - *The municipal retiree healthcare storm*
     
    * [4]
     
    * [4]
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  • Your profile picture
    3:34pm
    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.

Friday, October 22

  • Your profile picture
    10:24pm
    Changes to Event Date
    -
    Saturday, October 23, 2021 - 10:00am to Saturday, October 23, 2021 - 12:00pm
    +
    Saturday, October 23, 2021 - 9:30am to Saturday, October 23, 2021 - 12:00pm
  • Your profile picture
    9:46pm
    Nat Bender updated PEOPLE
    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.
  • Your profile picture
    8:01pm
    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.
  • Your profile picture
    7:54pm
    Changes to Paragraphs
     
    Aug. 2, 2021: DC 37 Retirees Assn. Statement on NYC Medicare Advantage Plus
     
    Aug. 2, 2021: DC 37 Retirees Assn. Statement on NYC Medicare Advantage Plus
     
    Plan
     
    Plan
      +
    -------- JUDGE'S TRO TEMPORARILY BLOCKS NYC MAPP -----------------------------
      +
    Judge's TRO temporarily blocks NYC MAPP
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  • Your profile picture
    6:50pm
    Changes to Body
     
    Voting Center [14] 
     
    Voting Center [14] 
     
    Find My Policy Group [15]
     
    Find My Policy Group [15]
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    **Results of elections for many of our 2021-2023 bargaining teams are in!*
      
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    *
      
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    The election results for many of the WFSE bargaining teams that will negotiate the next (2021-2023) contracts were certified at WFSE/AFSCME Council 28 Headquarters in Olympia on Friday, October 18, 2019.  Teams will start negotiations in 2020 for contracts taking effect July 1, 2021. Between now and then,  the president will make appointments to fill vacancies and bargaining team training and preparation will be scheduled.
      
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    *Click HERE [16] for the results.*
      
     
     
     
     
     
    [14] https://vote.wfse.org/index.cfm
     
    [14] https://vote.wfse.org/index.cfm
     
    [15] https://wfse.org/system/files/policy_group_descriptions_08.22.19.pdf
     
    [15] https://wfse.org/system/files/policy_group_descriptions_08.22.19.pdf
    -
    [16] https://wfse.org/system/files/election_results_1.pdf
      
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  • Your profile picture
    6:29pm

    In October of 2021, WFSE passed a resolution declaring our support of the 52,000 health care union members from 21 different locals employed with Kaiser Permanente who are currently in contract negotiations.

    Read the full resolution here.

    The Alliance Unions of Kaiser Permanente have shown that partnerships between labor, physicians, and management lead to better outcomes for patients, workers, and communities.

    We, nearly 47,000 Washington public employees, are in solidarity with Kaiser Permanente workers as they negotiate for the wages, benefits, and standards that will allow KP to continue providing the quality healthcare our communities so desperately need.

    We pledge to bring public attention to issues raised by KP workers and their unions during these negotiations.

    Read our union's full letter to KP here.

    The tens of thousands of KP healthcare workers who have saved countless lives must be recognized with a contract that ensures their dignity, security, and decision-making capacity.

  • Your profile picture
    6:23pm
    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.
  • Your profile picture
    4:44pm
    REPRINTED FROM Multnomah County

    October 22, 2021
    Brandy Fishback works as a behavioral health case manager for a Multnomah County contractor. In fall of 2020, she and her co-workers first sought union representation at work after concerns emerged about safety issues, oversight, inadequate training, and constant turnover.

    In March 2021, a strong majority of Fishback’s co-workers presented their union authorization cards. But after they filed for election, she said, her colleagues began to have second thoughts when an anti-union campaign emerged.

    If a labor harmony agreement had been in place beforehand, Fishback said, management would not have been able to try to to interfere with unionization efforts.

    “It was just a very confusing time,” Fishback told the Board of County Commissioners on Thursday, Oct. 21.. “By the end of the window of voting, we dropped down to 50 percent, and then way lower. ”

    Recognizing concerns from frontline workers, the Board unanimously adopted a labor harmony agreement. The agreement affirms the County’s commitment to having a stable and well-supported workforce and avoiding labor management conflicts and disruption of services.

    “Today is an important step forward in Multnomah County’s commitment to pursuing and supporting labor harmony agreements,” Chair Deborah Kafoury said. “We’ll continue to learn from national models, with our partners and through our own experience how to strengthen our efforts to build a stable workforce, ensure consistent high quality services and create thriving communities.”

    A labor harmony agreement, sometimes called a labor peace agreement, is a compact between an employer and organized labor designed to minimize the risk of labor disputes. The agreement — most common in the construction industry — is becoming more frequent in the social services sector.

    Members from American Federation for State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Council 75, along with the Universal Preschool Now coalition, helped craft and review the proposal.

    “This has been a long time coming,” said Stacy Chamberlain, the Executive Director for Oregon AFSCME(link is external). “Your commitment to labor peace and ensuring workers have a voice at work is not only appreciated by our union, but by all workers who have had to endure fights with their employer to find a voice and unionize in the workplace.”

    “Local 88’s support for this labor harmony resolution is more than a vocal act of solidarity,’’ said Raymond De Silva, the vice president of AFSCME Local 88(link is external). “It is an acknowledgment that pay, working...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    4:37pm

    We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

    Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

    Being in a union comes with an added bonus for Black and Hispanic workers, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data done by the Center for American Progress (CAP).  

    While unions increase wealth for all households, regardless of race or ethnicity, they provide larger increases for Black and Hispanic households when compared to their White counterparts.

    According to CAP:

    • For Black households with a union member, the median wealth is more than three times that of non-union Black households. 
    • For Hispanic households with a union member, the median wealth is more than five times that of nonunion Hispanic counterparts.  
    • For White households with a union member, the median wealth is nearly two times that of nonunion White households. 

    Why the added benefits? Because Black and Hispanic households start out more disadvantaged. In the words of the CAP analysts, “Because these households start from a lower base wealth, a larger union wealth premium compared with white households helps narrow the racial wealth gap.”

    By narrowing this gap, unions help decrease inequality and benefit the larger economy. As the authors point out, “The median white family has about 10 times the wealth of the median Black family and more than eight times the wealth of the median Hispanic family.”

    The added wealth comes in especially handy during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

    William Orange, who works in the nutrition department at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, told USA Today recently that being part of a strong union has made a huge difference in his and his family’s life. Orange, a member of Local 1363 (AFSCME Florida), used to work in warehouses with no union representation. Now he has a guaranteed 40-hour work week and paid sick leave.

    “It allows me to make a decent salary, and … if I get sick I can get paid and it doesn’t impact my financial situation with my family,” he said. “Being in the union gives you a sense of security.”

    Fellow AFSCME members Tarsha Laster and Charlotte Neal echoed Orange’s sentiments in interviews with USA Today.

    Laster,...

    Read more
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