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Yesterday, May 27

  • 8:31pm
    Changes to Description
    -
    The next AFSCME Local 1 general membership meeting will be on Thursday, March 2, 2023, starting at 5:30 PM on Zoom. Let us know if you need a Zoom link.
    +
    The next AFSCME Local 1 general membership meeting will be on Thursday, June 1, 2023, starting at 5:30 PM on Zoom. Let us know if you need a Zoom link.
     
    We'll see you (virtually) at the meeting, and thank you for all you do for our union!
     
    We'll see you (virtually) at the meeting, and thank you for all you do for our union!
     
    P.S. For your future planning, Local 1 meets quarterly on the first Thursday of each month divisible by three.
     
    P.S. For your future planning, Local 1 meets quarterly on the first Thursday of each month divisible by three.
    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    12:00pm
    Changes to Name
    -
    Vacant Chapter Chair Position
    +
    Anastasia Howard
  • Your profile picture
    11:44am
    Changes to Body
    -
    AFSCME Local 189 has a policy to post changes to policies two weeks ahead of the general membership meeting in which they will be voted on. There are currently no policies awaiting a second reading or vote.
    +
    It is the practice of AFSCME Local 189 to publish policy changes at least two weeks before the General Membership Meeting at which they will be heard and/or voted on.  It has been several years since our policies were reviewed for potential updates.  As part of the 2023-2025 term strategic plan, the Executive Board has convened a Policy Committee to conduct a comprehensive reveiw of all standing policies and make recommendations to bring our policies up to date. That *Committee's first report and recommendations [1]* will be heard and voted on at the General Membership Meeting on Tuesday, June 13, 2023.  All members in good standing are welcome and encouraged to attend.  
      +
    [1] https://actionnetwork.org/user_files/user_files/000/092/820/original/2023-05-26_Policy_Committee's_report.pdf
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  • Your profile picture
    10:53am
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  • Your profile picture
    10:50am
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  • Your profile picture
    10:48am
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  • Your profile picture
    10:45am
    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.

Friday, May 26

  • Your profile picture
    4:49pm
    Changes to Body
     
    *Q:* Where do I apply for unemployment benefits?
     
    *Q:* Where do I apply for unemployment benefits?
     
    *A:* mn.gov/uimn [1]
     
    *A:* mn.gov/uimn [1]
      +
    *Q:* When should I apply for Unemployment Benefits?
      +
    *A:* You should apply for benefits the week you become unemployed or your hours are greatly reduced. 
      +
    *Q:* When can I expect to start receiving benefits.
      +
    *A:* The first week you apply for and request UI benefits is considered your "Non-Payable Week", if your application is approved benefits should begin during your second week.  
      +
    *Q:* After I apply what do I do?
      +
    *A:* You should request a payment each week you are unemployed or your hours are greatly reduced. Request a payment even if DEED is determining your eligibility or you are awaiting an appeal. You may lose payments for weeks you do not request on time.
      +
    You can request a payment online Sunday-Friday from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. by going to *mn.gov/uimn [2]* select Applicants and then *Apply for Benefits [3]*. Phone options are listed on the UI website. 
     
    *Q:* Should I apply for unemployment benefits this summer?
     
    *Q:* Should I apply for unemployment benefits this summer?
     
    *...
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  • Your profile picture
    4:19pm
    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.
  • Your profile picture
    4:19pm
    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.
  • Your profile picture
    4:03pm
    Changes to Phone
    -
    (720) 771-8471
      
    Changes to Address
    -
    Hosmer Library
      
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  • Your profile picture
    3:48pm
    Thanking EMS professionals is not enough; we must help them solve a staffing crisis

    Member-provided photo

    In his early 20s, Kenneth Faria was a flight attendant for American Airlines when a passenger needed emergency medical care and the crew used a defibrillator to save his life.

    “After that experience, I was always a little bit curious about what else I could do for someone in an emergency,” Faria says.

    That curiosity eventually led Faria to pursue a career in emergency medical services (EMS), and today he is EMS district chief for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department in Hawaii’s capital.

    AFSCME members are celebrating National EMS Week, when we thank EMS professionals for the critical services and life-saving care they provide our communities every single day.

    AFSCME President Lee Saunders issued a press statement to honor EMS workers, asserting that our communities “cannot thank them enough for their tireless service.” But to truly thank them we must do more. We must help them solve a staffing crisis that they cannot address single-handedly.

    Faria loves serving the community where he was born and raised, and he has been working in EMS for 20 years. Just this week, he was reunited with a 95-year-old man whose life he helped save in April.

    “In my 20 years, I was fortunate to have some success with the treatments that I provide,” Faria says humbly, when asked what motivates him to keep going. “To see a person awake and talking without any residual effects from the cardiac arrest is amazing, because you can see the image of their face when they were lifeless and now you get to see them with life.”

    Faria also says there is “a big sense of pride” that comes with the job.

    “When I respond to an emergency and arrive with all my tools, there is a strong sense of pride,” he says. “I know I can make a difference for this person. We have very good training, we pride ourselves on that. I like to welcome the challenge, figure out what’s going on, use...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    3:48pm
    Thanking EMS professionals is not enough; we must help them solve a staffing crisis

    Member-provided photo

    In his early 20s, Kenneth Faria was a flight attendant for American Airlines when a passenger needed emergency medical care and the crew used a defibrillator to save his life.

    “After that experience, I was always a little bit curious about what else I could do for someone in an emergency,” Faria says.

    That curiosity eventually led Faria to pursue a career in emergency medical services (EMS), and today he is EMS district chief for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department in Hawaii’s capital.

    AFSCME members are celebrating National EMS Week, when we thank EMS professionals for the critical services and life-saving care they provide our communities every single day.

    AFSCME President Lee Saunders issued a press statement to honor EMS workers, asserting that our communities “cannot thank them enough for their tireless service.” But to truly thank them we must do more. We must help them solve a staffing crisis that they cannot address single-handedly.

    Faria loves serving the community where he was born and raised, and he has been working in EMS for 20 years. Just this week, he was reunited with a 95-year-old man whose life he helped save in April.

    “In my 20 years, I was fortunate to have some success with the treatments that I provide,” Faria says humbly, when asked what motivates him to keep going. “To see a person awake and talking without any residual effects from the cardiac arrest is amazing, because you can see the image of their face when they were lifeless and now you get to see them with life.”

    Faria also says there is “a big sense of pride” that comes with the job.

    “When I respond to an emergency and arrive with all my tools, there is a strong sense of pride,” he says. “I know I can make a difference for this person. We have very good training, we pride ourselves on that. I like to welcome the challenge, figure out what’s going on, use...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    3:48pm
    Thanking EMS professionals is not enough; we must help them solve a staffing crisis

    Member-provided photo

    In his early 20s, Kenneth Faria was a flight attendant for American Airlines when a passenger needed emergency medical care and the crew used a defibrillator to save his life.

    “After that experience, I was always a little bit curious about what else I could do for someone in an emergency,” Faria says.

    That curiosity eventually led Faria to pursue a career in emergency medical services (EMS), and today he is EMS district chief for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department in Hawaii’s capital.

    AFSCME members are celebrating National EMS Week, when we thank EMS professionals for the critical services and life-saving care they provide our communities every single day.

    AFSCME President Lee Saunders issued a press statement to honor EMS workers, asserting that our communities “cannot thank them enough for their tireless service.” But to truly thank them we must do more. We must help them solve a staffing crisis that they cannot address single-handedly.

    Faria loves serving the community where he was born and raised, and he has been working in EMS for 20 years. Just this week, he was reunited with a 95-year-old man whose life he helped save in April.

    “In my 20 years, I was fortunate to have some success with the treatments that I provide,” Faria says humbly, when asked what motivates him to keep going. “To see a person awake and talking without any residual effects from the cardiac arrest is amazing, because you can see the image of their face when they were lifeless and now you get to see them with life.”

    Faria also says there is “a big sense of pride” that comes with the job.

    “When I respond to an emergency and arrive with all my tools, there is a strong sense of pride,” he says. “I know I can make a difference for this person. We have very good training, we pride ourselves on that. I like to welcome the challenge, figure out what’s going on, use...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    3:48pm
    Thanking EMS professionals is not enough; we must help them solve a staffing crisis

    Member-provided photo

    In his early 20s, Kenneth Faria was a flight attendant for American Airlines when a passenger needed emergency medical care and the crew used a defibrillator to save his life.

    “After that experience, I was always a little bit curious about what else I could do for someone in an emergency,” Faria says.

    That curiosity eventually led Faria to pursue a career in emergency medical services (EMS), and today he is EMS district chief for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department in Hawaii’s capital.

    AFSCME members are celebrating National EMS Week, when we thank EMS professionals for the critical services and life-saving care they provide our communities every single day.

    AFSCME President Lee Saunders issued a press statement to honor EMS workers, asserting that our communities “cannot thank them enough for their tireless service.” But to truly thank them we must do more. We must help them solve a staffing crisis that they cannot address single-handedly.

    Faria loves serving the community where he was born and raised, and he has been working in EMS for 20 years. Just this week, he was reunited with a 95-year-old man whose life he helped save in April.

    “In my 20 years, I was fortunate to have some success with the treatments that I provide,” Faria says humbly, when asked what motivates him to keep going. “To see a person awake and talking without any residual effects from the cardiac arrest is amazing, because you can see the image of their face when they were lifeless and now you get to see them with life.”

    Faria also says there is “a big sense of pride” that comes with the job.

    “When I respond to an emergency and arrive with all my tools, there is a strong sense of pride,” he says. “I know I can make a difference for this person. We have very good training, we pride ourselves on that. I like to welcome the challenge, figure out what’s going on, use...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    3:48pm
    Thanking EMS professionals is not enough; we must help them solve a staffing crisis

    Member-provided photo

    In his early 20s, Kenneth Faria was a flight attendant for American Airlines when a passenger needed emergency medical care and the crew used a defibrillator to save his life.

    “After that experience, I was always a little bit curious about what else I could do for someone in an emergency,” Faria says.

    That curiosity eventually led Faria to pursue a career in emergency medical services (EMS), and today he is EMS district chief for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department in Hawaii’s capital.

    AFSCME members are celebrating National EMS Week, when we thank EMS professionals for the critical services and life-saving care they provide our communities every single day.

    AFSCME President Lee Saunders issued a press statement to honor EMS workers, asserting that our communities “cannot thank them enough for their tireless service.” But to truly thank them we must do more. We must help them solve a staffing crisis that they cannot address single-handedly.

    Faria loves serving the community where he was born and raised, and he has been working in EMS for 20 years. Just this week, he was reunited with a 95-year-old man whose life he helped save in April.

    “In my 20 years, I was fortunate to have some success with the treatments that I provide,” Faria says humbly, when asked what motivates him to keep going. “To see a person awake and talking without any residual effects from the cardiac arrest is amazing, because you can see the image of their face when they were lifeless and now you get to see them with life.”

    Faria also says there is “a big sense of pride” that comes with the job.

    “When I respond to an emergency and arrive with all my tools, there is a strong sense of pride,” he says. “I know I can make a difference for this person. We have very good training, we pride ourselves on that. I like to welcome the challenge, figure out what’s going on, use...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    3:48pm
    Thanking EMS professionals is not enough; we must help them solve a staffing crisis

    Member-provided photo

    In his early 20s, Kenneth Faria was a flight attendant for American Airlines when a passenger needed emergency medical care and the crew used a defibrillator to save his life.

    “After that experience, I was always a little bit curious about what else I could do for someone in an emergency,” Faria says.

    That curiosity eventually led Faria to pursue a career in emergency medical services (EMS), and today he is EMS district chief for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department in Hawaii’s capital.

    AFSCME members are celebrating National EMS Week, when we thank EMS professionals for the critical services and life-saving care they provide our communities every single day.

    AFSCME President Lee Saunders issued a press statement to honor EMS workers, asserting that our communities “cannot thank them enough for their tireless service.” But to truly thank them we must do more. We must help them solve a staffing crisis that they cannot address single-handedly.

    Faria loves serving the community where he was born and raised, and he has been working in EMS for 20 years. Just this week, he was reunited with a 95-year-old man whose life he helped save in April.

    “In my 20 years, I was fortunate to have some success with the treatments that I provide,” Faria says humbly, when asked what motivates him to keep going. “To see a person awake and talking without any residual effects from the cardiac arrest is amazing, because you can see the image of their face when they were lifeless and now you get to see them with life.”

    Faria also says there is “a big sense of pride” that comes with the job.

    “When I respond to an emergency and arrive with all my tools, there is a strong sense of pride,” he says. “I know I can make a difference for this person. We have very good training, we pride ourselves on that. I like to welcome the challenge, figure out what’s going on, use...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    3:48pm
    Thanking EMS professionals is not enough; we must help them solve a staffing crisis

    Member-provided photo

    In his early 20s, Kenneth Faria was a flight attendant for American Airlines when a passenger needed emergency medical care and the crew used a defibrillator to save his life.

    “After that experience, I was always a little bit curious about what else I could do for someone in an emergency,” Faria says.

    That curiosity eventually led Faria to pursue a career in emergency medical services (EMS), and today he is EMS district chief for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department in Hawaii’s capital.

    AFSCME members are celebrating National EMS Week, when we thank EMS professionals for the critical services and life-saving care they provide our communities every single day.

    AFSCME President Lee Saunders issued a press statement to honor EMS workers, asserting that our communities “cannot thank them enough for their tireless service.” But to truly thank them we must do more. We must help them solve a staffing crisis that they cannot address single-handedly.

    Faria loves serving the community where he was born and raised, and he has been working in EMS for 20 years. Just this week, he was reunited with a 95-year-old man whose life he helped save in April.

    “In my 20 years, I was fortunate to have some success with the treatments that I provide,” Faria says humbly, when asked what motivates him to keep going. “To see a person awake and talking without any residual effects from the cardiac arrest is amazing, because you can see the image of their face when they were lifeless and now you get to see them with life.”

    Faria also says there is “a big sense of pride” that comes with the job.

    “When I respond to an emergency and arrive with all my tools, there is a strong sense of pride,” he says. “I know I can make a difference for this person. We have very good training, we pride ourselves on that. I like to welcome the challenge, figure out what’s going on, use...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    3:48pm
    Thanking EMS professionals is not enough; we must help them solve a staffing crisis

    Member-provided photo

    In his early 20s, Kenneth Faria was a flight attendant for American Airlines when a passenger needed emergency medical care and the crew used a defibrillator to save his life.

    “After that experience, I was always a little bit curious about what else I could do for someone in an emergency,” Faria says.

    That curiosity eventually led Faria to pursue a career in emergency medical services (EMS), and today he is EMS district chief for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department in Hawaii’s capital.

    AFSCME members are celebrating National EMS Week, when we thank EMS professionals for the critical services and life-saving care they provide our communities every single day.

    AFSCME President Lee Saunders issued a press statement to honor EMS workers, asserting that our communities “cannot thank them enough for their tireless service.” But to truly thank them we must do more. We must help them solve a staffing crisis that they cannot address single-handedly.

    Faria loves serving the community where he was born and raised, and he has been working in EMS for 20 years. Just this week, he was reunited with a 95-year-old man whose life he helped save in April.

    “In my 20 years, I was fortunate to have some success with the treatments that I provide,” Faria says humbly, when asked what motivates him to keep going. “To see a person awake and talking without any residual effects from the cardiac arrest is amazing, because you can see the image of their face when they were lifeless and now you get to see them with life.”

    Faria also says there is “a big sense of pride” that comes with the job.

    “When I respond to an emergency and arrive with all my tools, there is a strong sense of pride,” he says. “I know I can make a difference for this person. We have very good training, we pride ourselves on that. I like to welcome the challenge, figure out what’s going on, use...

    Read more
  • Your profile picture
    3:48pm
    Thanking EMS professionals is not enough; we must help them solve a staffing crisis

    Member-provided photo

    In his early 20s, Kenneth Faria was a flight attendant for American Airlines when a passenger needed emergency medical care and the crew used a defibrillator to save his life.

    “After that experience, I was always a little bit curious about what else I could do for someone in an emergency,” Faria says.

    That curiosity eventually led Faria to pursue a career in emergency medical services (EMS), and today he is EMS district chief for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department in Hawaii’s capital.

    AFSCME members are celebrating National EMS Week, when we thank EMS professionals for the critical services and life-saving care they provide our communities every single day.

    AFSCME President Lee Saunders issued a press statement to honor EMS workers, asserting that our communities “cannot thank them enough for their tireless service.” But to truly thank them we must do more. We must help them solve a staffing crisis that they cannot address single-handedly.

    Faria loves serving the community where he was born and raised, and he has been working in EMS for 20 years. Just this week, he was reunited with a 95-year-old man whose life he helped save in April.

    “In my 20 years, I was fortunate to have some success with the treatments that I provide,” Faria says humbly, when asked what motivates him to keep going. “To see a person awake and talking without any residual effects from the cardiac arrest is amazing, because you can see the image of their face when they were lifeless and now you get to see them with life.”

    Faria also says there is “a big sense of pride” that comes with the job.

    “When I respond to an emergency and arrive with all my tools, there is a strong sense of pride,” he says. “I know I can make a difference for this person. We have very good training, we pride ourselves on that. I like to welcome the challenge, figure out what’s going on, use...

    Read more
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